2 Feb 2016

Brand New BuyLinuxCDs.co.uk

What? - you may ask. You only changed the BuyLinuxCDs.co.uk design back in October 2015! And now again?

Yes, again! - I will tell you.

BuyLinuxCDs.co.uk is a commercial arm of this blog. You can order a disk with your favourite operating system on that site and it will be delivered to your door.

So, what has changed on that site?

The root cause of all the other changes, the site now runs a proper E-Com platform instead of using a third-party hosted script for processing your orders. It gives me more convenience in running the site. It works better for you!

Site navigation is now clearer and E-Com oriented.

The list of distributions you can order from the site is now re-worked. Some defunct distributions are gone, some more added.

The price determination procedure is now fully automated and extended. There are now 4 different prices that will be determined on your location:

  • 2.00 GBP for UK customers.
  • 4.50 EUR for customers in Europe, plus ex-USSR republics.
  • 5.50 USD for USA and Canada customers.
  • 3.50 GBP for the customers in other parts of the world.


Just to celebrate the launch of this new web site, BuyLinuxCDs.co.uk offers you a 10% discount from above prices in February 2016. To get the discount, use the coupon code LAUNCH.



26 Jan 2016

4 Ways to Use Whatsapp Messenger on Your Computer

I have recently written about the Telegram Messenger, the secure way to exchange messages with your friends via Internet using your mobile device or computer.

However, Telegram is not the market leader in the world of mobile messengers. Who is? I think you guessed it right: Whatsapp.

Whatsapp was initially designed to work on mobile phones. As in Telegram and other mobile messengers, your account with Whatsapp is your phone number. But does it mean that a mobile device is the only way to use Whatsapp? As in the Telegram case, the answer is "no".

There are several ways to use the Whatsapp messenger on your computer. I specifically don’t mention "Linux" here. I will explain later why.

21 Jan 2016

4 tools to play Windows Games on Linux?

Linux operating systems gives the stability that Windows platform somewhere fails to deliver. But what about gaming? Can we compare Windows and Linux on gaming front? I don't think it will be a fare game to compare both on this aspect. Users who want to go with gaming will rarely use Linux and users who are comfortable with Linux operations will rarely go for Windows. Both are big competitors to each other and both have respective pros and cons.

But when it comes to gaming then Windows leads Linux somewhere. What does that mean, can't we play games on Linux? Well it's not true and today we can easily play most of the Windows games on our Linux system. Here I will showcase some tools that will convert your Linux machine into a gaming ware.

12 Jan 2016

5 ways to use the Telegram messenger on your Linux computer

Mobile technology develops rapidly nowadays. Do you remember that just 5-8 years ago the most you could get from your mobile device was phone calls and text messages?

Today your smartphone can do more than a typical computer could do 10 years go. Plus, smartphone is also mobile and very often connected to the Internet.

One of the areas that grows exponentially now among smartphone applications is instant messengers. The ability to send your friends messages through the Internet attracts many users, especially as these messages cost many-many times less than standard text messages (SMS). "Many-many times" actually means free. You only pay for the traffic you use, which is quite cheap except for roaming cases. And you can send cross-border messages at the same [nil] price as local, which is impossible to achieve for Mobile Network Operators.

If you still don't understand what messengers I am talking about, I'd like to name two: Whatsapp and Viber. You should have heard at least one of these names.

But I will not talk about these apps. I don't use them. I don't trust them.

What do I use? I use Facebook Messenger and Telegram.

Facebook Messenger - because I use Facebook anyway. But what is Telegram you may ask?

Telegram is a relatively new player on this market. It has three benefits that make it stand out for me:
  1. it is open source.
  2. it is secure – you can get a serious prize for breaking its security!
  3. it is absolutely free and will never push ads.
At least, these are promises for now. And I trust them.

Telegram is available on your mobile phone AND on your desktop both, which is quite convenient when you share your time between both.

It is quite clear how you can use your messenger on the phone. But how can you run Telegram on the desktop? There are actually five ways to do so. Let's have a look at them.

5 Jan 2016

Linux-running car: can you feel me?

This is probably the least Linux related post on this blog... but still it has some words about Linux.

Tesla is one of the hottest discussion topics for few last years. Yes, this is a state-of-the art car that drives on electricity and offers you a pure pleasure... At least, that's what many reviewers and ads tell you.

I have had a chance to look inside this car and even sit in it. That's why I want to share my opinion on it.

25 Dec 2015

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

Another year has gone. It was a nice year. A year when I returned to blogging. A year when many troubles went away. A year of hope. A year of love.

Let me wish to all of my readers

Merry Christmas!

Happy New Year!

I wish you all the best in the coming year!

See you all in 2016!

Stay tuned to Linux notes from DarkDuck.

22 Dec 2015

How-to video: Removing old kernels in Ubuntu

Once new kernel passes the test system, Ubuntu offers you to install it through its update system.
At the same time, old kernel remains in the system. It means that after some time of using Ubuntu, you may have a number of old kernels. They take your disk space and also may clutter the GRUB menu, although the latter issue is resolved in newer versions of Ubuntu.

This video shows you the way to remove old obsolete kernels from your Ubuntu installation.

The same approach is valid for whole Ubuntu family and derivatives: Xubuntu, EdubuntuKubuntu, Zorin OS, Linux Mint and so on.


Please remember that the "best practice" is to keep at least two kernels in the system: the current and the previous one. This is to ensure the fallback solution if current kernel fails for whatever reason.

How many old kernels do you have in your system? How often do you remove the obsolete kernels?